Author Topic: Chain oiler nozzle position  (Read 777 times)

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Offline Lemonwizard

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Chain oiler nozzle position
« on: January 04, 2021, 10:09:38 »
I bought a chain oiler system called "Nemo 2". While looking at the bike and where I could best position the oil reservoir I noticed that there was just one nozzle applying oil to my chain, and I thought how is one small nozzle supposed to keep a 1.5 cm wide chain well lubricated.

In a Youtube video guide they said you're supposed to let the nozzle rest against one side of the sprocket; this is also how the picture in the installation instructions looks like.

How is this supposed to oil the other side of the chain?  :crazy:

Perhaps I could cut the oil dispensing end in half and glue short pieces of tube to it so it can lubricate both sides of the sprocket?
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Online Rixington43

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2021, 10:18:12 »
Well Scottoiler have now released a twin nozzle applicator which lubes both sides of the sprocket so obviously they believe there is a case for applying to both sides (or they just needed a new thing to sell :) ). All I can say is that, if you use the thin oil they specify, it gets pretty much everywhere you can imagine until you get the flow rate just right. The theory is that the oil is applied at the bottom of the sprocket and then centrifugal force pulls it through the chain and gradually flings it into your chain guard along with any grit and rubbish off the road.
All I can say is after a bit of fettling of flow rate, mine seems to keep the whole chain slippery and fairly clean without coating the entire rear end of the bike in oil. Let's face it, you're only really oiling the o/x rings inside the side plates and the oil definitely finds both of those easily enough.
Be prepared to whip your chain guard off every now and again though to wipe away the thick gummy mix of oil and road dirt from the underside.

Online Oop North John

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2021, 10:50:43 »
I've only ever had the single nozzle ones (Scottoiler and TUTORO) and like Rixington43 said, it seems to lubricate everything quite nicely.

Offline Brockett

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2021, 11:15:21 »
Try it as designed first. IMHO the most important point is fixing the 'end feed outlet' so that is does not get caught in the sprocket or chain. I was surprised at the amount of flex that can be generated in that area.
This doesn't last forever, so do it while you can.

Offline Ianmc

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2021, 11:26:23 »
Don’t underestimate the cheapest oiler on the market,the “Loobman” it comes with a twin oil feed as standard and the whole kit is cheaper than the Scottoiler twin nozzle alone.It’s manually operated so you only operate the oiler as and when required.I have had one for about 4yrs.now and have just removed an old Scottoiler and fitted a Loobman that came off my old bike. Note: for anyone that wants to convert to a twin nozzle,Loobman will sell you a twin nozzle kit for only a few quid,UK made and in the post same day.
Ian Mc.

Online Mr Nick

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2021, 12:02:30 »
OP already has a competitor's oiler so you might not see any commission this time Ian.

Sorry, I thought you were a salesman for them...
Seems pearl asbo orange is faster after all....

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Offline Ianmc

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2021, 13:48:58 »
    Just a satisfied customer that doesn’t like throwing money away,it must be my Scottish ancestry,with a few relatives in Yorkshire.
    If anyone has any grief with their Scottoiler,when all of the lockdowns are over,I have a bag of bits that they are welcome to,I would prefer collection as there is a little oil left in the tank that I cannot for some reason empty out and I don’t think the postie would be too happy with blue oil on his hands and in his postbag 😂😂
Ian Mc.

Offline Lemonwizard

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2021, 14:42:21 »
I certainly like my chain nice and clean https://imgur.com/a/0q1uDc1

I've thought about centrifugal force pulling the oil through the chain, but I don't see how centrifugal force alone keeps both sides of the chain lubricated. Well, I've never studied physics though. Plus, there are probably other things going on as well; perhaps the oil's being rubbed around on the chain rail guide (if that's how it's called). Anyway, single-sided lubrication seems to be working fine for the gentlemen here, so I'll go with that before needlessly tinkering around. Thanks.
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Offline Ianmc

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2021, 17:48:18 »
When I bought the present bike there was a Scottoiler fitted with a single sided feed,on the side that the nozzle was on, the chain links and sprocket were awash with oil, and the other side was totally red rusty including the link faces.The sprocket teeth and chain rollers were well lubricated, the other thing that put me off the Scottoiler is that if you have the bike running whilst stationary, the oiler is still working and it soon leaves a puddle of oil on the floor below the sprocket.
Ian Mc.

Online Oop North John

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2021, 08:02:02 »
the other thing that put me off the Scottoiler is that if you have the bike running whilst stationary, the oiler is still working and it soon leaves a puddle of oil on the floor below the sprocket.

That's one of the reasons I now use the TUTORO automatic oiler, another reason is there's no need to tap into a vacuum or electrics for it to work. It does have a similar problem with changes of temperature, just like the Scottoiler etc, but I find it easier to get it right, and so much easier to bleed as well.

Online Mr Nick

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2021, 11:17:34 »
I find the brush system on my PD Oiler to be no hassle at all: doesn't drip like these others do and doesn't concentrate the oil on one part of the chain either. No buried connection to the vacuum to deteriorate & cause issues either. There was a Scottoiler on the SV I had when I bought it & I thought about keeping it for myself until I tried it.

Your Nemo seems an interesting idea: fully manual but you turn the cover to squeeze some oil into the feed system rather than holding a button or pumping a bulb. Downside is the price is a bit much for a manual system when there's ones as cheap as Ian's out there. I can replace my automatic one for about the same.
Seems pearl asbo orange is faster after all....

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Offline kwackboy

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2021, 18:21:36 »
Chain links are sealed by the x-rings therefore don't really need to be lubed but it's beneficial to keep them clean so, an oil feed just on the lower part of the rear sprocket is all that's needed to lube the inner rollers.
Eventually the oil will find its way to the remaining areas keeping it clean.

Although Tutoro advise not to place their oilers on the swingarm, for me it works very well here.
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Offline Mac1

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2021, 09:51:39 »
Interesting post. I am in the market for an oiler, either loobman, pd or tutoro.

As an aside mr nick I find your avatar impossible to live with and consequently skip your posts....which is a shame

Offline Lemonwizard

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Re: Chain oiler nozzle position
« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2021, 21:33:51 »
I knew I said I wouldn't fiddle around and try it with one nozzle first but I just couldn't help it.

See you in another four months when I've mounted it onto the bike and tell you about my observations. Yes, I procrastinate that hard.  :shy:
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